Welcome to the reallymoving forum
Got questions and need some advice? Our forums have answers on everything from choosing the right property, to renting and selling.
  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to get out of a joint mortgage

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to get out of a joint mortgage

    Hi all
    Just wanted a bit of advice (solicitors appointment pending!)
    Last July i bought a house with my now ex boyfriend. . Unfortunately back in January we split up. We have been living together since, but quite frankly i can't take anymore of it , the fighting etc. It's getting out of hand and i just can't move on whilst i'm still there.
    Basically we went to see the lender in Feb to see if he could take the mortgage on ( i made the appointment etc). He was told he was not able to afford it. Since then, he has done nothing to try and move things forward. I have asked and asked to no avail, what he wants to do, ie try another lender or sell. He is completely unwilling to talk about it. Burying his head in the sand. The other day i told him i was going to go to a solicitor and force the sale. He laughed in my face and told me good luck as it would cost me a fortune. I am seriously thinking of not paying my half now and having it reposessed, which i know would ruin my chances of future mortgages and loans etc. But things are so bad at home that I'm running out of options.
    I also got a loan from black horse for a car which is up next april. He has removed me from teh insurance so i can't drive it. He is the registered keeper of the car, and he pays the money into the bank account each month. But we agreed to share the car. Everything is going wrong , just don't know where to turn
    Thanks for any help

  • #2
    Re: How to get out of a joint mortgage

    pants that there's no replies

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How to get out of a joint mortgage

      But they are correct. You and your ex have a loan which is secured against the property. You are both contractually obliged to repay the loan. This obligation will only end when the loan is repaid. Think of it from the lender's point of view - why would they remove one person's obligation, when they don't have to.

      In any case, the names on the mortgage have to match the names of the legal owners of the property. If the mortgage is still in joint names then the mortgage has to be as well - and if the mortgage is still in joint names then the property must still be as well. The fact that you may have agreed that the property is now solely yours does not affect this (although the agreement is likely to be binding on your ex).

      The only way out of this is for you to remortgage in your sole name, effectively buying the house from you and her. But you need to get a mortgage to do this. Even back in the good times buy to let mortgages tended to need at least 20% or 25% down from you. So you are never going to get better than this in the current climate.

      I'm afraid the lenders simply don't agree with your assertion that this is "no risk to them at all". For a start, are you allowing for the additional costs of renting, such as regular inspections, gas safety certificates, etc? And what about time when you might not have a tenant in place? Or the risk of a tenant who does not pay rent (it might take several months to evict them)? And you have no idea what the rental market might be like in 2 or 3 years time - perhaps rents will fall so they won't be enough to cover the mortgage.

      At the end of the day most people will move mountains to stay in their own home, so lenders are prepared to take a bit more risk. But with a buy to let there is far less incentive for you not to default on the loan, so lenders take a much harder line when deciding whats risky.

      Comment

      Working...
      X