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Access required to recover belongings

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  • Access required to recover belongings

    Hi,

    I am an ex-tenant of a privately let property.
    We left some things behind in the house after vacating it at the end of the tenancy. Is it legally possible for me to gain access to the property to recover my belongings?
    There are now new tenants living in the property and the letting agents are refusing access.
    What channels would we need to go through? Any advice welcome.

    Thanks, Andrea

  • #2
    Have you tried approaching the new tenants direct?
    This is based on my experience as a conveyancing solicitor in England, but I do not accept liability for information I give in this forum

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    • #3
      Hi - no I haven't and have been advised by the letting agent that I shouldn't.
      The problem is that a part of my deposit is currently in dispute with The Dispute Service and we feel letting agent is being very unreasonable. We also feel that the disputed deposit should not be an issue to reclaiming our property.

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      • #4
        It is nothing to do with the letting agent whether you contact the new tenants direct or not: you are entitled to approach them to arrange to collect your property. If anyone prevents you collecting your property, that is an "unlawful interference with goods" (a civil matter). I do not think it is a criminal matter, so there would be no point in trying to involve the police if the new tenants prove difficult. However, the threat of civil action may be sufficient

        You have not said what the property is. If it is an item of furniture, and the new tenants may genuinely believe it came with the house. I suggest you take with you your copy of the inventory (to show your property is not included in it). If the new tenants produce their inventory, showing that your property is included in it, that might give you scope for complaining to the police that the landlord is guilty of theft (dishonestly appropriating the property of another with the intent of permanently depriving them of it) - that is a crime, and the police may well get involved, if only to have an easy addition to their crime clear-up statistics - I'm quite cynical!

        That's enough for you to absorb now, I suspect - as you can see, it is a fairly complicated scenario
        This is based on my experience as a conveyancing solicitor in England, but I do not accept liability for information I give in this forum

        Comment


        • #5
          To add to my last post: if you think there has been theft, I suggest you point this out to the agents, and give them a chance to rectify things, before rushing off to the police
          This is based on my experience as a conveyancing solicitor in England, but I do not accept liability for information I give in this forum

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