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How fair is the Dispute service?

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  • How fair is the Dispute service?

    I have my tenancy deposit in a deposit protection scheme, but am concerned about the fairness and procedure of the dispute system, can anyone help me?

  • #2
    Re: How fair is the Dispute service?

    Apologies, I know you posted sometime ago. I think handing over a large sum of money in the form of a deposit is a worry for all tenants, particularly those who have heard of unscrupulous landlords who take your money for looking at them wrong.

    I think of the three deposit schemes out there, the Deposit Protection Scheme seems to be the best. They do not charge any fee's, they are independent of tenant and landlord and any party can request the money back (i.e. the tenant can ask for the deposit back independently).

    By the time the deposit comes to be returned, the DPS have already made their money so to speak, so there is no benefit for them to deny you your deposit, or award a claim to your landlord.

    In any case, if the landlord wishes to make a claim on your deposit, they must provide proof of damages, otherwise your deposit should be returned to you in full.

    The best way to make sure your deposit is protected, is by ensuring your landlord or letting agent either prepare themselves, or have an independent company prepare a property inventory report. This lists the contents and condition of the rental property, a document which you should check and sign if its accurate and refuse to sign if its not.

    Only when you are happy that the property inventory report is a true and accurate record should you sign. From then on in, the landlord would have to produce proof of damage which couldn't be contributable to fair wear and tear.

    Hope this helps, if you need any help then message me.

    Nick

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