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Soundproofing Party Walls

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  • Soundproofing Party Walls

    This is my first posting on this forum so here it goes, for the last 12 years I have been installing home cinemas in to clients properties, since the rush over the last 7 to 8 years to build developments very quickly we are now involved in having to soundproof more and more clients houses, is this a problem for many on this forum. If so could you let me know who are the worst offenders with regards to developers. Our aim is to contact developers with a view to getting them to take in to account sound ingress from neighbours.
    Thanks again for reading this.

  • #2
    Hi Xantech and welcome to HomeMove.

    As for developers - the worst offenders are almost certainly the big national builders, but as these are driven by profits to shareholders rather than build quality first, I wouldn't really envisage them making too much effort on addressing the issue. This is especially as it'll be lower profit property where it would be more of an issue, such as semis, detached, and flats.

    2c.

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    • #3
      Fully agree

      Hi and thanks for taking the time to read my posting, I fully agree the big developers are the culprit and yes it is about profit. Our problems are not only on low value developments however, some so called high value apartments are now being put up with no care or consideration for party wall construction, I believe that as a big developer the cost of doing the job at the outset would be rather insignificant if incorporated in the initial build. We find these problems with big developers when we talk to them about futureproofing their properties, they keep saying that their customers have not expresses an interest in these items.
      Crest Nicolson seem to be 1 developer who has seen the light and is starting to at least lay cat5e cable around their houses rather more liberaly.

      Hi and thanks again, and if any member wants any advice on futureproofing or installation questions dont hessitate to leave a posting.

      Home Cinema Lighting Control Home Automation and Soundproofing are our speciality.
      Thanks again

      Comment


      • #4
        No problem - if you're interested, I also run a small home entertainment forum you may or may find useful to get known in:
        Pro Home Digital forums - Powered by vBulletin

        Only a small forum at present, but has been penciled in for future portalisation with a news service, blog, latest product announcements, reviews, etc.

        I have a habit of setting up these things, you see, and HomeMove is simply the latest.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would love a home entertainment system, however we're not planning on adding one at any time in the future. We're waiting until we get a new home.

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          • #6
            I am trying to soundproof a party wall, any recomendations?

            I am having trouble with neighbours complaints about noise of my drum practice.


            I contacted the people at the soundproofingforum web site.

            They gave me a quote for materials of £900 and said I would probably need to contact an installer unless I was very DIY competent.

            Has anyone found cheaper sources for soundproofing materials?

            Also anyone who has had a go at DIY soundproofing have any tips or advice on best way to do it cheaply?

            Comment


            • #7
              The standard of quality nowadays is appalling - we went to see some properties that were potentially buy-to-lets and everything from the capentry to the carpets was a disgrace.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by peteboy View Post
                I am having trouble with neighbours complaints about noise of my drum practice.
                What are you practicing on? A full kit, reduced kit or practice pads?

                If you're not using practice pads, would it be cheaper to buy them rather than the soundproofing?

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                • #9
                  I need soundproofing as it have to practice with full kit.

                  I thought I should say I am practicing with others so am using full kit and want to get the levels right.


                  Originally posted by peteboy View Post
                  I am having trouble with neighbours complaints about noise of my drum practice.


                  I contacted the people at the soundproofingforum web site.

                  They gave me a quote for materials of £900 and said I would probably need to contact an installer unless I was very DIY competent.

                  Has anyone found cheaper sources for soundproofing materials?

                  Also anyone who has had a go at DIY soundproofing have any tips or advice on best way to do it cheaply?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Um...try hiring a rehearsal room - that's what we used to do, and no neighbours to complain about it.

                    Frankly, doing drum practice with neighbours is bloody inconsiderate!

                    Originally posted by peteboy View Post
                    I am having trouble with neighbours complaints about noise of my drum practice.


                    I contacted the people at the soundproofingforum web site.

                    They gave me a quote for materials of £900 and said I would probably need to contact an installer unless I was very DIY competent.

                    Has anyone found cheaper sources for soundproofing materials?

                    Also anyone who has had a go at DIY soundproofing have any tips or advice on best way to do it cheaply?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am a chartered engineer in acoustics and work with all types of sound insulation issues.

                      I find myself having to defend the developers. They are simply building and selling dwellings. The dwellings must meet the building regulations minimum standards for sound insulation. This standard is set by the government not the developers.

                      The minimum standard could be higher that is true, but ultimately this will cost more to build and the cost will be passed on to the buyer. There is clearly a trade off to be made.

                      It isn't too dissimilar to any other product. Everything could be made better/stonger/longer lasting/more efficient - but ultimately this will cost more money.

                      I have some information on my website BlueTreeAcoustics dot com but it might not answer specific questions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Soundproofing Party Walls

                        · 1
                        Start with a bare wall with the wood studs exposed. The sheetrock or drywall should not be in place yet
                        · 2
                        Pack the cavity between the studs with a fiberglass bat insulation such as R13.
                        · 3
                        Seal the back of the outlets in the wall with firestop putty pads, because even a one percent opening in a wall can let through 50% of the noise.
                        · 4
                        Add mass to your wall, because in simple physics mass will block airborne sound waves such as conversation, television noise, ringing phones and alarm clocks. There is a mass loaded vinyl product available though various acoustical companies that weighs one pound per square foot, but is only 1/8" thick.
                        · 5
                        Use an acoustical caulk to seal all open joints and perimeter around the wall.
                        · 6
                        Isolate or float your drywall off of the studs by using resiliant channel or isolation clips. By doing this you are blocking structure-borne noise such as footfall noise and slamming doors.
                        · 7
                        Finish the wall with a double layer of drywall or sheetrock, minimum thickness 1/2".

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