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Inserting a Power Point

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  • Inserting a Power Point

    Hi

    Is it possible and how difficult would it be to add a power point to your house!? How much might that cost to do?

    thanks

  • #2
    Hi,

    Are you doing this yourself?

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi
      No, certainly not, i dont have the experience! well, unless the response to my question is "yes, it's really simple" !

      thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Inserting a Power Point

        Things You'll Need:

        • Shovel
        • PVC cutter
        • PVC cement
        • Drill
        • 1/2 inch drill bit to make access hole
        • Junction box
        • Wire cutters
        • Wire nuts
        • Silicone caulking
        • Outside receptacle for the application, equipped with watertight gasket, GFI type
        • Voltmeter for testing the circuit


        1. Step 1
          Call the local building authorities and inquire about the building codes for your local. Follow these codes in your work, especially as you may require an inspection of the finished project. Also this will protect you from possible liability if any accidents result from your electrical installation.
        2. Step 2
          Draw a diagram of the project. You must include where you are going to tap the power line, where the outdoor lines must be run and how the lines outside will be terminated. Include as well any switches and receptacles you plan on installing.
        3. Step 3
          Measure the distances and lengths of the conduit and wire that you will need for the project. Running the outside power lines through conduit is the safest method of protecting the wiring. Buried PVC conduit is the easiest to work with and hold up to weather extremely well.
        4. Step 4
          Dig a 4-inch trench along the path that the wire will run. Place the conduit along this trench and cut the lengths as you are placing the conduit. Make sure that you have all the connection fittings for connecting the tubing.
        5. Step 5
          Run the wire through the conduit before cementing the conduit together. Run the conduit all the way from the outside endpoint back to the house; allot enough excess wire at both ends. Cut the remaining wire off.
        6. Step 6
          Trace the wire along the trench and cement the conduit together as you go. Cement the conduit together. Place the conduit into the trench and fill in the trench from endpoint back to the start point at the house.
        7. Step 7
          Connect the end point to the type of receptacle that you plan to use. Insure you safely cap or terminate the wires within the receptacle.
        8. Step 8
          Turn off the circuit to the point that you will be tapping for the power lines to the outside. Drill a hole through the side of the house to slip the line through and pass the power line through to the point of merging with the power source.
        9. Step 9
          Use silicone caulking to seal the hole around the wire as it enters the house to keep weather and pests from entering the house. Expose the source of power for the outside line. Strip off about ½ inch of insulation, twist the source lines together with the outside extension lines, and terminate with a wire nut.
        10. Step 10
          Seal the source line and newly installed outside wiring lines. This will be in the junction box or breaker box. Double check each connection and trace the line back to the termination point, visually checking each connection.
        11. Step 11
          Switch the power back on to the new part of the circuit and test the receptacle at the termination point in the yard.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Inserting a Power Point

          Crystal - thanks for all of your posts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Inserting a Power Point

            I get the impression Crystal has copy/pasted these instructions from an American website so this advice should probably be ignored, especially as it seems to cover what we would call "connecting to the National Grid" (or a subset thereof)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Inserting a Power Point

              Originally posted by googler View Post
              I get the impression Crystal has copy/pasted these instructions from an American website so this advice should probably be ignored, especially as it seems to cover what we would call "connecting to the National Grid" (or a subset thereof)
              And they are instruction for external works not internal
              Adding a socket can be a simple task depends on you expertise and the location you are intending.[or get electricain to quote].
              You can be dead an awful long time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Inserting a Power Point

                It's an easy job for someone who knows what they are doing. If you don't, get an electrician to do it. Electricity bites :-)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Inserting a Power Point

                  Yep get an electrician to do it. Make sure they have PART P!
                  Letting Agents Milton Keynes www.prestigemk.com
                  www.trading-standards-approved.org.uk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Inserting a Power Point

                    Getting an electrician to do it certainly removes the risk of death!!

                    Comment

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