Welcome to the reallymoving forum
Got questions and need some advice? Our forums have answers on everything from choosing the right property, to renting and selling.
  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

wood or pvc windows

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • wood or pvc windows

    I live in an old farmhouse and need to replace the windows. Everyone goes for pvc these days but I intended to have mine made of timber, because I prefer the traditional approach.
    The only thing that's put me off is that on one website they were saying that double glazed wooden windows start to deteriorate after 6 /8 years.
    However, not a word was said about the downsides of pvc - e.g. 20/25 life, becoming brittle following exposure to sun, almost impossible to repair, not practical to recycle etc.etc.
    Does anyone have personal experience of wooden double glazed windows which would help me make a decision.

    Many thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I would go with PVC if you are looking for durability. I lived in a house with wooden windows and they we a nightmare, especially if they split in the winter.

    But then again if you are looking for that rustic authentic look then wood would be better.
    Find A Flatmate

    Comment


    • #3
      Many thanks Chris for your comment. I appreciate it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Geoff,
        When i first looked into this i had a fairly rigid view that pvc windows couldn't possibly be a better option than timber. However, on studying this in more detail i found that the complete opposite is true!

        Pvc windows are more durable and require less maintenance then wooden ones, and remarkably they are increasing becoming more environmentally friendly than wood due to the amount of recycled pvc they incorporate and energy they can retain within a building. As i understand it, the number of treatments applied to wood to keep it up to standard when used as a window means that at the end of its life it can only go into landfill.

        Hope this helps,

        John
        www.eviee.co.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: wood or pvc windows

          Wood windows are better for the environment than PVC windows, a new WWF report has concluded. PVC windows were found to be less sustainable and more hazardous than wood in the report Window of opportunity: The environmental and economic benefits of specifying timber window frames.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: wood or pvc windows

            Geoff - there is no doubt you are making the right decision

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: wood or pvc windows

              Geoff.
              Wood windows made from properly selected timber will not break down after 6-8 years. Most timber window makers supply pre-painted products where the paint finish alone is guaranteed for 10 years. I have completed many projects where this is evident and recently wrote an article on one case study. While wood windows and doors will need some maintenance, with some care they will last a life-time, and more.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: wood or pvc windows

                Hello!

                Being employed in the Danish PVC industry for many years I would like to challange the post in which World Wildlife Fund is quoted. WWF says that PVC is less sustainable and contains hazardous substance and therefore wood windows should be a better choice.

                During the last ten to twenty years the European PVC industry has been working hard on sustainable development. Hazardous substances have been replaced and collecting and recycling of waste is taking place to a bigger and bigger extend. Please see the website for the European PVC industry's voluntary commitment on sustainable development: Vinyl 2010.

                When it comes to environmental issues I am convinced that PVC windows are not a bad choice at all compaired to wood windows. Today it might even be better.

                Best regards
                Ole Grondahl

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: wood or pvc windows

                  I would suggest you to go for pvc windows if you want durability for long and other benefits.Me too have been using pvc windows since years.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: wood or pvc windows

                    If you are thinking to use of double glazed wooden windows, so this is a good option for your farmhouse. We can not decide the life of wooden timber that is about 6-8 year. The age of it also depend on quality and paint on wooden window. For environment point of view this is a best option.

                    But, now a days PVC is also using, manufacture companies are making more sustainable less hazardous PVC windows.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: wood or pvc windows

                      I reakon a wooden double glazed window would look fantastic in an old farmhouse more authentic than PVC after reading all the comments and past experience it depends on where you get your windows from but both can equally be durable and environmentally friendly.. therefore research some companies to find the best option for you..
                      We have debt solutions to help you get out of debt problems

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: wood or pvc windows

                        Originally posted by The Duke View Post
                        Geoff.
                        Wood windows made from properly selected timber will not break down after 6-8 years. Most timber window makers supply pre-painted products where the paint finish alone is guaranteed for 10 years. I have completed many projects where this is evident and recently wrote an article on one case study. While wood windows and doors will need some maintenance, with some care they will last a life-time, and more.
                        I completely agree - not only to wood windows look better but regular maintenance and they will last longer!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: wood or pvc windows

                          My vote is also gone for PVC if you are looking for sustainability. I lived in a house with wood windows that are a nightmare, especially if separated during the winter and if you're looking for that rustic look authentic and the tree would be better.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: wood or pvc windows

                            Wooden window will be good for this situation because as you explain that you like traditional timber windows and i personally like it also and definitely it is more strong then pvc.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: wood or pvc windows

                              Window manufacture has rapidly progressed over the last two decades, resulting in a far simpler buying process and a wider choice of design and materials than ever before, but there remain some key points you should consider. Mark Brinkley explains.

                              Twenty years ago, virtually everyone building a new home or an extension used timber windows. They arrived on site as bare frames, with just a base coat of stain applied to them. These frames were then fixed into the walls as the building went up, and the glazing was carried out weeks later, usually just before the scaffolding was taken down. Sometimes it got overlooked and ended up being done off a ladder a week or two later. Back then, the glazing was just a single pane: anyone fitting double glazing would have had to be building an eco house. After the glass was fitted, the sole question was whether to paint or stain the frames.
                              Meanwhile, over in suburbia, things could not have been more different. There a replacement window boom was in full swing. Replacement windows were almost always plastic — technically PVCu. These windows sold themselves on adding value, comfort, efficiency (by virtue of being double glazed) and offering a maintenance-free product.
                              Unlike the new build market, where designers and builders were all used to working with standard openings into which manufactured frames could be easily fitted, the replacement window manufacturers were all producing made-to-measure products, which made them rather more expensive on a like-for-like basis, and thus effectively kept them out of the new build market. So the two markets, new build and replacement, remained more or less separate.
                              However, a change in the Building Regulations in 1990 at last made double glazing mandatory in new builds and extensions and much of the cost advantage enjoyed by the timber window suppliers vanished overnight. For the timber window manufacturers, it got worse still. It turned out that fitting double-glazed sealed units into bare frames on site was a distinctly hit or miss affair and soon the NHBC, the housebuilders’ main warranty provider, was swamped with complaints from angry new home buyers about their windows misting up, only to find out that the NHBC warranty didn't even cover glazing defects. Ouch.
                              Not surprisingly, the major house builders abandoned timber and switched en masse to pre-glazed plastic windows. It was a move many of their customers approved of in any event, as they liked the idea of maintenance free windows. Manufacturers such as Speedframe then set up shop to cater for this new market and started to make plastic windows in long production runs, designed to slot into the standard opening sizes beloved of the UK house building industry.

                              But all was not lost for timber windows. In 1998, the NHBC at last brought glazing failures within their warranty scheme, but with some very strict conditions. No longer would they tolerate sloppy glazing-off-a-ladder-withsome- putty stuff, but insisted that glazing should be housed correctly in the frame and that the bottom rail should be drained and vented, to avoid moisture build-up. By far the easiest way to do this was to glaze in the factory, not on site, and this was the catalyst to change the way timber windows were supplied.
                              You can still build timber window frames in the old manner, but it’s not to be recommended. As Keith Topliss of Howarth Timber Windows says, “90% of the problems we have with glazing units stem from the 10% of our market that still uses on-site glaziers. Misting up on factory-glazed windows is now so rare that it’s virtually a thing of the past.” So rather than having two different window industries, as we did in the 1980s, we now tend to have all windows supplied the same way.
                              However, factory glazing is still not without its issues. The product is essentially pre-finished before it arrives on site and so is liable to damage in transit, as well as during and after fitting. It makes sense, therefore, to fit the windows in as late as possible in the build programme, ideally after the external cladding is complete. This has led to the use of various sub-frames which are built into the wall and act as housing for the windows, often allowing them to be fitted from the inside.
                              So bear in mind that there is a lot more to it than choice of material. Ask questions about how the windows are fitted into your walling system, and at what stage they are best fitted. Do they use proprietary sub-frames and if so are they compatible with your build methods? Generally made-to-measure windows are between 20-30% more expensive than ones made for standard British openings. As a rule, imported windows have to be made to measure for the UK market.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X