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What can be the reason of damps? Please help!

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  • What can be the reason of damps? Please help!

    Hi,

    I'm looking at buying a discounted flat having a wall covered by damps in its bathroom. The estate agency said it might be caused by leaking pipes. I would really love to buy the property and do it up. But how much would it cost me on earth if something's leaking inside the wall!? The flat itself is a part of a managed composite which got 24-hour concierge. Anyone got any idea how much would it possibly cost me to fix the leaking pipe inside the wall? Also, would this possibly be a problem of the building manager's, since this is a managed property? Maybe I can get some help from the building manager? Anyone has encountered this kind of problem before? Really appreciate any help here! Many thanks!

  • #2
    Not enough clues to give a sensible answer. Sorry.

    I am a specialist in dampness in buildings, and if I were there I could probably diagnose the cause. But not from here unfortunately.

    There are numerous possible causes - some of which could be quickly eliminated just by viewing the pattern of dampness and associated stains/mould, and by the pattern of dampmeter readings within the room itself and in rooms adjacent.

    Condensation (a favourite in bathrooms). Plumbing leak (within the flat or the flat above). Rain penetration. Rising damp (if within a metre of ground level or same height from adjacent flat roof/balcony). Penetrating damp if below ground. Intermittent spillage in a flat above (around a shower tray or bath, or from a leaky washing machine). Defective wall-ties (if the affected wall is of cavity construction). Hygroscopic plaster (plaster which can absorb airborne moisture whenever humidity is high). Etc etc.
    Renovation opportunity, 3b det., Carmarthenshire
    http://www.webbo.weebly.com

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    • #3
      Gutterings full of soggy leaves is one of the most common, and daft, seeing as it's so easy to sort.

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      • #4
        Yep. Very few people (understandably!) stand outside in the rain looking at their homes. But it's a very good idea to do so. Take a strong umbrella and a pair of binoculars, and during heavy rain, see where the water goes. Is it spilling from the guttering? Or missing the guttering altogether? If the downpipes go straight into the ground instead of discharging over an open drain, tap them to see if they sound like they're filling up with water (they shouldn't be). Check for leakage from cracks behind the downpipes - especially old iron ones, and from joints in downpipes or guttering. Is the rain that hits the windows running nicely off the cills? Or is it dribbling back under them? Is water puddling in areas where it can enter subfloor air vents, or above dampcourse level? Is water getting away from flat roofs and balconies?

        Everyone should do this kind of survey in the rain. But hardly anyone does ;o)
        Renovation opportunity, 3b det., Carmarthenshire
        http://www.webbo.weebly.com

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