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Repairing / Removing pebbledash

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  • Repairing / Removing pebbledash

    Hi,

    I am looking at a couple of houses that are ripe for renovation and that won't take too long, and provide a fairly good return when complete.

    However, both have pebbledashing.

    One of the houses, the render (for sake of the proper word) is seperating in places from the brick work, plus also going thin in other places.

    The render is also quite old.

    The other, it is not quite as bad, however, there is a tide mark where the guttering has not worked properly (overflowing, which has also led to damp in the main bedroom).

    How can it be repaired (both instances) or if I was to attempt to remove it, how should it be removed and how would I clean up the walls where it has been removed?

    Thanks.
    Community spirited? http://www.AshfieldFOCUS.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by AshfieldFOCUS.com View Post

    How can it be repaired (both instances) or if I was to attempt to remove it, how should it be removed and how would I clean up the walls where it has been removed?

    Thanks.
    Arrrrrrrrrgh the dreaded PD word. Personally, I can't stand the stuff and would never buy a house with it on as I always wonder what horrors might be lurking underneath!

    I'm thinking that if you don't have the confidence/experience/expertise to deal with 'it' yourself, it might be better to get a builder in to do it for you.

    Afterall, you'll want to make sure it's done properly as first impressions count and, not forgetting, the all-important 'kerb appeal'.

    Kaz

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    • #3
      Once any type of external cement render, be it pebbledash or any other texture, has enough faults to be producing damp patches inside the house - it's usually time to have it renewed completely.

      Always carry binoculars when inspecting houses. If you can see cracks withing the top third of the render, or if the uppermost edge looks vulnerable to spillage from guttering, the chances are that water which is getting in during the winter months will freeze, lifting more render away from the wall lower down. And very old render can become quite porous.

      If the house is one of several similar ones in the area, check out the state of the others. Have they all been re-rendered already?
      Renovation opportunity, 3b det., Carmarthenshire
      http://www.webbo.weebly.com

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      • #4
        And don't be tempted by these offers you see from companies offering to apply some thin coating over the top of existing faulty rendering - usually spraying on some plastic coating followed by a fine grit - they are a very poor substitute for doing a proper job.
        Renovation opportunity, 3b det., Carmarthenshire
        http://www.webbo.weebly.com

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