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Buying Period House

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  • Buying Period House

    Hi,

    I am new to this forum and would be grateful for any advice!

    We are first time buyers and are looking to place an offer on a period house. This house was built circa 1890. We are happy with the size and make up of the house and the general area. Presumably anything relating to the structure, plumbing, heating, insulation will be looked at in the survey. However, are there any specifics, particularly relating to period homes that we should be considering at this stage?

    I have read advice about getting a report from land registry as regards neighbouring houses and the prices that they sold for relative to their asking prices; it looks like this costs £69; is it necessary / useful to get it?

    We have not yet found a solicitor or surveyor; is it best to have these lined up prior to making an offer. We do have an offer in principal from bank.

    Many Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Buying Period House

    There's nothing particularly special about a house built about 1890 - there are thousands of them!
    RICHARD WEBSTERwww.rwco.co.uk
    As a conveyancing solicitor I want to be helpful (England/Wales only) but can't accept liability for this.

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    • #3
      Re: Buying Period House

      Hi DellyMac,

      First of all: good luck with buying your first property, it's a big step to take but a great thing to do. Don't rush into anything, take your time and consider your options thoroughly.

      As Richard has said there's nothing unusual about Victorian properties, and certainly nothing that should concern you any more than any other house unless it's a listed property which may be a little different.

      As you have already suggested you really need to rely on the opinion and expertise of your surveyor (for a house of that age it is worth paying for a proper survey rather than a simple mortgage valuation). However, a surveyor will not normally test appliances and services such as heating systems and plumbing etc, they will often simply advise you to get a specialist report if they note anything that they feel warrants further investigation.

      The surveyor will check for things like damp, rot, woodworm, subsidence, roof structure, gutterings etc etc...... All the things that could affect the structural integrity of the overall building, but have a chat with a few surveyors to find out what they offer.

      You don't need to get a solicitor or surveyor lined up prior to offer, but there's no harm in doing so. They may not be able to give you accurate quotes for their services until they know what property you are buying but at least you'll know who to go to as soon as you are ready to get started.

      You can get land registry sold prices from the internet free of charge (just search for Nethouseprices) although this may not be as detailed as a proper land registry report.
      Last edited by IFA; 28-03-2011, 12:23 PM.
      ____________________________________________
      Property for sale in Torquay

      www.thomasdobner.co.uk

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      • #4
        Re: Buying Period House

        Thanks for that.

        Just wondering about energy efficiency ratings. I believe that D is considered average. The one we're looking at is in the E region: 53 and has a potential of 56. Does anyone know the impact that the low rating might have on heating etc? I am more concerned about the fact that the potential rating is quite low, presumably meaning that there is little that we can do to improve it.

        I'm not overly familiar with these ratings so would be grateful for any insights!

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        • #5
          Re: Buying Period House

          Don't take these ratings too seriously.

          For instance if there is some form of central heating the DEA can't check that the boiler works. He just looks at its type and then looks the type up in his book and gives it a grade accordingly. So an old oil boiler in the first EPC I had done was rated as "average" even though it didin't work.
          RICHARD WEBSTERwww.rwco.co.uk
          As a conveyancing solicitor I want to be helpful (England/Wales only) but can't accept liability for this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Buying Period House

            I wouldn't waste £69 on the Land Registry report if I were you. It's a waste of time as it won't tell you what the condition of the house was at the time i.e. palace or wreck and whether the owner needed a quick sale to avoid repossession or were in no hurry at all.

            You are right that a D rating is considered average. You need to ask the EA to show you the whole EPC so you can see what work needs doing to increase the rating i.e. replace the boiler with a condensing one (combi), increase the amount of loft insulation etc.

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            • #7
              Re: Buying Period House

              I'd say its worth getting the land registery report. Its £69 but may save you from buying a house that might have problems that are not visable now but may appear further down the line.
              Er, what does the Land Registry know about "problems that are not visable now but may appear further down the line."? They don't know anything about structural matter that this comment seems to be referring to.
              RICHARD WEBSTERwww.rwco.co.uk
              As a conveyancing solicitor I want to be helpful (England/Wales only) but can't accept liability for this.

              Comment

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